naamahdarling:

hauntedsticks:

freckledtrekkie:

becausesometimesdreamsdocometrue:

disney-tasthic:

gastalicious-definition:

disney-tasthic:

globalsoftpirka:

disney-tasthic:

thedisneydifference:

Mulan loved my Mulan pen!
She said, “I love things that have my face on it.”

Wow, Mulan, conceited much ;). Seems like you may have been spending some time with Gaston!

NOOOOOO OOOOOONESHOOTS LIKE MULAN

WEARS MEN’S SUITS LIKE MULAN!

THINKS FAST AND KICKS ASS ON A ROOF LIKE MULAN

MULAN: “I USE AVALANCHES IN ALL OF MY BATTLE SCHEMIIIING!”

NOT QUITE A GUY, THAT MULAN!

WHEN I WAS A GIRL I DRANK 3 CUPS OF TEAEVERY MORNING TO HELP ME GROW STRONG

NOW I’VE GROWN UP I DRINK FIVE CUPS OF TEAAND I DEFEATED THE KING OF THE HUUUUUUUNS

This is the best thing ever.

naamahdarling:

hauntedsticks:

freckledtrekkie:

becausesometimesdreamsdocometrue:

disney-tasthic:

gastalicious-definition:

disney-tasthic:

globalsoftpirka:

disney-tasthic:

thedisneydifference:

Mulan loved my Mulan pen!

She said, “I love things that have my face on it.”

Wow, Mulan, conceited much ;). Seems like you may have been spending some time with Gaston!

NOOOOOO OOOOOONE
SHOOTS LIKE MULAN

WEARS MEN’S SUITS LIKE MULAN!

THINKS FAST AND KICKS ASS ON A ROOF LIKE MULAN

MULAN: “I USE AVALANCHES IN ALL OF MY BATTLE SCHEMIIIING!”

NOT QUITE A GUY, THAT MULAN!

WHEN I WAS A GIRL I DRANK 3 CUPS OF TEA
EVERY MORNING TO HELP ME GROW STRONG

NOW I’VE GROWN UP I DRINK FIVE CUPS OF TEA
AND I DEFEATED THE KING OF THE HUUUUUUUNS

This is the best thing ever.

pilgrimkitty:

blame-my-muses:

inkandash:

Someone asked me once, as a kind of dig at the movie, “Why someone like Zoe would have a dress?”
I looked right at him and said, “There’s only one white dress a woman like Zoe would keep. Her wedding dress.”

Well shit.

OUCH.

Except … it could also be a mourning dress, since white is the color of mourning in the Chinese culture Firefly heavily appropriates. So whether Zoe’s wearing her wedding dress or had to buy new clothes is dependent on which cultural tradition is more dominant in funeral rites.

(Source: withnopowercomesnoresponsibility)

Anonymous asked: Um. Clint makes Steve and Bucky read Harry Potter. The Avengers all have very, very strong opinions about which house they get sorted into. Bucky thinks he's a Slytherin, but Steve says he's a Hufflepuff through and through.

ifeelbetterer:

"This isn’t a legitimate classification system," said Steve angrily, throwing the book onto the couch next to Clint. "This is bullshit. They’re children, for cripe’s sake.”

Clint’s eyebrows rose to comical levels.

"You can’t just isolate different children or—or— or try to predetermine their characters at age eleven," Steve said, thoroughly angry. "And you certainly can’t condemn an entire fourth of your school’s population to a villainy house, what the hell is that?”

He started to pace.

"As if people never change! As if there’s no moral or ethical growth after age eleven!

Bucky reached over Clint and picked up the book. Clint gave him a look and he shrugged.

"Hell, if it makes Steve this angry, I gotta check it out," he explained.

***

"This isn’t a basis for education!" Bucky shouted. "Where are the art classes, huh? Kids this age should have access to art classes."

"Exactly!" shouted Steve. "Maybe a little less institutionalized racism and a little more arts education, am I right?"

Clint buried his head in his hands.

experimentaltimeorder:

afrofuturistaffair:

Books on Science Fiction and Black Speculative Critical Analysis

1. The Black Imagination: Science Fiction, Futurism and the Speculative (Black Studies and Critical Thinking) (2011) by Sandra Jackson - This critical collection covers a broad spectrum of works, both literary and cinematic, and issues from writers, directors, and artists who claim the science fiction, speculative fiction, and Afro-futurist genres.

2. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film (2008) by Adilifu Nama - The first book-length study of African American representation in science fiction film, Black Space demonstrates that SF cinema has become an important field of racial analysis, a site where definitions of race can be contested and post-civil rights race relations (re)imagined.

3. Race in American Science Fiction (2011) by Isiah Lavender III - Race in American Science Fiction offers a systematic classification of ways that race appears and how it is silenced in science fiction, while developing a critical vocabulary designed to focus attention on often-overlooked racial implications. These focused readings of science fiction contextualize race within the genre’s better-known master narratives and agendas.

4. Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present (2011) by Robin Means Coleman - Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian “Nollywood” Black horror films.

So basically Im bout to spend all the money on the books Ive sold so far, on these books. Needs alla this.